History

The Gordie Foundation

The nonprofit Gordie Foundation was founded in Dallas in 2004 by Michael and Leslie Lanahan, whose son, Lynn Gordon "Gordie" Bailey Jr., died of an alcohol overdose at the University of Colorado after a fraternity initiation ceremony on September 17, 2004.  As part of the hazing ritual, Gordie and his 26 other pledge brothers were "encouraged” to drink four handles (1.75 liter bottles) of whiskey and six (1.5 liter) bottles of wine in 30 minutes. Later in the evening, a visibly intoxicated Gordie was left to "sleep it off."   He was found dead the next morning, face down on the floor of his fraternity house. No one had called for help.

In just six years, the Gordie Foundation made an impact on hundreds of thousands of students across the country through its programs and educational efforts.

The University of Virginia’s Center for Alcohol & Substance Education

The Center for Alcohol & Substance Education (CASE) was created in 1987 as the Institute for Substance Abuse Studies (ISAS) to create, evaluate and disseminate effective prevention programs for youth. For more than two decades, ISAS/CASE developed innovative and award-winning approaches to reduce the negative consequences of drinking. ISAS/CASE has partnered with national organizations, including the National Collegiate Athletic Association, the U.S. Department of Education, and the Bacchus Peer Education Network, to share these programs with a national audience.

The Gordie Center for Substance Abuse Prevention

In the summer of 2010, the Gordie Foundation and CASE joined forces to become the Gordie Center for Substance Abuse Prevention. The Gordie Center is dedicated to honoring Gordie’s memory by creating and distributing programs to reduce hazardous drinking and promote peer intervention among young adults.  The Gordie Center builds on CASE’s 23-year history of developing award-winning substance abuse prevention programs for the University of Virginia community and beyond.  The Gordie Center carries on many of the efforts created through the Gordie Foundation, including National GORDIEday (part of National Hazing Prevention Week) as well as marketing the documentary, HAZE, which tells Gordie’s story as a framework for examining the larger issues of alcohol and hazing on campus. The Gordie Center is committed to ensuring that Gordie’s story continues to impact students by challenging attitudes about the true risks of hazing and alcohol use through the creation of the national Gordie’s Call campaign which debuted with the GORDIEcheck/Blood Alcohol Content card.